Sudan: A Revolution in the Making?

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By Rob Johnston

The 2011 Arab Springs shaped much of the contemporary Middle East and North African (MENA) region, but the large, mainly desert country of Sudan appeared to be unaffected. That is until now. In the past four weeks we have seen increasing tensions within the country as protestors take to the streets, speaking out against current President Omar al-Bashir.

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To Be or Not to Be: UK’s EU Withdrawal, a Shakespeare Tragedy in the making? Opinion Piece on British Reality

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By Sophie Minter

On the 10th December 2018 the press release published by the Court of Justice in the European Union, while perhaps representing a figurative and patronizing shrug of the shoulders as if to say “it’s ok, we all make mistakes”, represented a significant public acknowledgment. We (The UK) now have other options than simply those of insanity. The contents of the press release outlining the judgment made in Luxemburg offers an essential second chance.

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The Calm Between The Storms

By Thomas Sherlock

Today has been dramatic to say the least.

Two secretaries of state have resigned. Two junior ministers have resigned. Several MPs have publicly declared their letters to the 1922 Committee, calling for a vote of no confidence in the leadership of Theresa May. The necessary 48 letters have not been received (yet).

Studying politics often means deriving a strange sense of enjoyment out of tumultuous days such as this, and it’s easy to see why. Twists and turns at all corners, sudden character developments-it’s the same reason TV series such as House of Cards and Bodyguard entertain. However unlike those shows, today might have very, very real consequences.

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The Political Mess in Brazil Following ‘Operation Car Wash’

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By Christian Oliver

It would surely be an understatement to deem Brazil’s political climate leading up to the October general election to be anything but dramatic and unpredictable. Presidential nominees have been stabbed, convicted for corruption, imprisoned, and have called for violent attacks on the opposition; all as a by-product of a corruption scandal bigger than ‘Watergate’.

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The US Exception: A Policy of Deny and Ignore-How the US has managed to turn a blind eye to blatant human rights abuses

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By Sophie Minter

For years the US-Saudi relationship has been an irritating itch, one that is not understandable and blatantly one sided, but what the recent assassination of the journalist Jamal Khashoggi shows is that this relationship will endure reflecting one of those cringey bromance scenes where it is obvious that one of the two clearly loves the other more, and the other knows and openly exploits this one-sided relationship.

 

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Rwandan Genocide: How the UN facilitated one of the most devastating genocides in history

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By Francis Forsey

Content Warning: This article will discuss themes of genocide.

‘Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it’ – George Santayana (1906)

This popular quote has been emblazoned upon many murals and memorials, and ingrained in the hearts of many historians and political commentators. 24 years on, the UN has seemingly forgotten the past.

In 1994, the United Nations (UN) failed over 800,000 people, and facilitated one of history’s most infamous genocides.

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What We’re Reading: ‘Fall Out’ by Tim Shipman

By Thomas Sherlock

imagesIn this comprehensive book, Tim Shipman aims to document the tumultuous events of British politics from the rise of Theresa May in July 2016 to her leadership under siege in October 2017. A follow-up to his previous book All-Out War, which covered the lead-up, campaign and immediate aftermath of the EU referendum in 2016, Fall Out provides an insight into the events that followed, ranging from the Chiefs’ management of Number 10, plotting in the corridors of Parliament and how the election thought to be the ultimate coup for May turned into a defeat snatched from the jaws of victory. Summarised as above, it is easy to mistake the events of the last two years for that of a political thriller.

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Italy at the Polls between Violence and Silence

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By Laura Serra 

Interesting political times are anything but over. The upcoming Italian general elections seem bound to shake again both national politics, and the politics of Europe at large. As in several other countries, and especially due to the impact of the refugee crisis on its shores, the populist wind blowing throughout Europe has found in Italy an especially receptive audience. Two out of the four main parties running can be considered ‘populist’, with the Five Star Movement (which supposedly has no political colouring) and the Northern League (which has a very dark political colouring) respectively making use of the anti-establishment and anti-immigration rhetoric; and finding common ground on their vigorous Euroscepticism. Immigration, specifically, is the issue most heavily discussed in political debates and the one most likely to be driving Italian votes. Like elsewhere in Europe, the ‘economic cleavage’ of working class and white-collar voters is being superseded by the ‘cultural cleavage’ of those who support cosmopolitanism and multiculturalism and those who do not.Continue reading “Italy at the Polls between Violence and Silence”

Many say Djibouti could soon become the next Dubai or Singapore, so what is holding it back?

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By Francis Forsey

Known by few in common society, Djibouti is a country to watch.

With a population of 942,333 (2016), and a land area of 23,200 km2, Djibouti is one the smallest countries in the international community. To compare Djibouti to the hegemonic states around the world, such the United States, Russia or China, is to take leave of one’s senses. However, the world continues to remind us that size doesn’t matter when it comes to international significance.Continue reading “Many say Djibouti could soon become the next Dubai or Singapore, so what is holding it back?”